“StoryPix” – a digital storytelling card game

Created for:

  • Digital Media Design for Learning (DMDL) degree; Cognitive Science and Educational Technology II course (Fall 2013).

Project length:

  • Medium-long (approx. last quarter of the term, final group project design document).

Team:

  • Robyn Berland
  • Heather Kim
  • Matt McGowan
    • my principle contributions: “Summary of Project,” “Points of Viewing Theory,” and “Wireframes.”
  • Cooper Wright

Challenge:

  • As a group, produce a full, thorough design document on a project of mutual interest.

The full design document for this project can be found here:

“StoryPix” design document (pdf)

But here’s an excerpt from the “Summary of Project”:

StoryPix is a platform-agnostic, digital card game designed for middle-school-age children and older. It is an image-based storytelling environment that both visualizes and verbalizes the multitude of ways that people interpret the world. Like other social media platforms, StoryPix users will share images with the intention of telling their “story.” Unlike other social media platforms, StoryPix users will be encouraged to present their images in a more deliberately sequential manner, to present them more like a story, and to create an interpretation of the visual stories of others.

The learning objective of the game is to encourage players to think about their own and others’ thinking. Players will create a story constructed from a series of “cards” or “frames,” static images being either self-created or found (photos or drawings). These images are then sequenced to tell a story (as do, for example, comic strips and photo essays). Players then add a title (of no more than three words) and a descriptive, narrative text (of no more than 200 characters) to accompany their picture sequence. Once a story is completed, the player “publishes” the story and shares it with another player. The recipient of the story, however, only sees the story’s title (not the original narrative text) and a “stack” of images/cards/frames that have been “shuffled” and placed in a random order. The recipient player must then guess the originating player’s story in the original order of the cards and send their guess back to the originating player, along with their own (under 200-character) narrative text. Recipient players are allowed three tries to “get it right.” Players also have the option of sharing one story with multiple recipients, allowing the creator of the visual story to view the multiple ways in which their story is being interpreted. Finally, the player has the option to publish their story, giving other friends or the community a chance to interpret the story as well.

and a few of of the wireframes we included:

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